Vortech's new JT-B Supercharger as seen on Ronnie Reynolds' NMRA Coyote Modified engine. Photo Courtesy Mike Galimi/NMRA

Vortech’s new JT-B Supercharger as seen on Ronnie Reynolds’ NMRA Coyote Modified engine. Photo Courtesy Mike Galimi/NMRA

Hot on the heels of the redesign of their world-beating YSi supercharger, Vortech Engineering went back to the drawing board to develop a brand-new compressor called the V-7 JT-B supercharger.

The new unit takes its inspiration from the YSi redesign.

“The traditional JT supercharger has a cast wheel, but the JT-B has a billet wheel with quite a few improvements,” says Vortech’s Lance Keck. “The inducer diameter is legal for competition in NMRA Coyote Modified, and the technology we’ve learned through our billet wheel development program has been applied to the JT-B supercharger.”

He explains that the impeller profile is unique to this compressor, and there are a number of other functional changes within the supercharger.

The latest version of the JT supercharger uses a V-7 style gearcase with a 10mm impeller shaft, and due to the increased performance of the new JT-B supercharger in terms of airflow, a 7/16-inch impeller shaft is used for added strength and durability.

Billet impeller wheel construction on the CNC machine at Vortech Superchargers.

Billet impeller wheel construction on the CNC machine at Vortech Superchargers.

The supercharger is manufactured in two clockwise rotation versions, one with a straight discharge [PN 2A158-090/-098] and one with a curved discharge [ PN 2A158-100/-108], and a counter-clockwise straight discharge housing [PN 2A159-090/-098].

(Left) Cast JT impeller on the left, billet JT-B impeller on the right. You can see the distinct differences in design here. (Right) The before-and-after of a JT-B impeller. Modern machining is awesome!

The proof is in the pudding--a back-to-back test of the JT and JT-B trim on Beefcake's machine. The JT-B is simply better, all across the board. This test was run on Reeves' 2011 Coyote Modified Mustang through a Turbo400 transmission.

The proof is in the pudding–a back-to-back test of the JT and JT-B on Beefcake’s machine. The JT-B is simply better, all across the board. Nearly 100 horsepower and 35 pound-feet of torque, to be specific. This test was run on Reeves’ 2011 Coyote Modified Mustang through a Turbo400 transmission, which he says soaks up quite a bit of power “on paper” from what they’ve learned in testing.

The JT-B supercharger is capable of 29-plus pounds of boost pressure and well over 1,000 horsepower depending upon engine combination. As you can see from the dyno graph above (graciously provided by Terry Reeves of Team Beefcake Racing), in action, the supercharger performs quite well. This particular combination is a 302 cubic inch Bischoff Engine Service-built Coyote engine that’s full of tricks to get it to live in NMRA Coyote Modified competition, and is built to take full advantage of the supercharger’s performance.

Beefcake's other car, this brand-new 2015 Mustang, holds the record for quickest S550 car at this point with its JT-B trim supercharger and completely stock, OE engine. Reeves is always testing new products for his business, and has achieved a best pass so far of 9.59 at 145 mph for his efforts.

Beefcake’s other car, this brand-new 2015 Mustang, holds the record for quickest S550 car at this point with its JT-B supercharger and completely stock, OE engine. Reeves is always testing new products for his business, and has achieved a best pass so far of 9.59 at 145 mph for his efforts.

“The standard JT will fall off once it reaches a certain RPM level. The JT-B just keeps pulling and when it gets to that peak, it still carries power. It didn’t just fall off like the regular JT impeller,” says Reeves.

Ronnie Reynolds in the process of winning the Coyote Modified class at the Maryland stop on the NMRA tour with his Vortech JT-B supercharger. Photo: Mike Galimi, NMRA

Ronnie Reynolds in the process of winning the Coyote Modified class at the Maryland stop on the NMRA tour with his Vortech JT-B supercharger. Photo: Mike Galimi, NMRA

Another Coyote Modified racer sporting the new JT-B supercharger is NMRA newcomer Ronnie Reynolds, who runs his 2013 Mustang out of the Revolution Automotive camp in Baltimore, Maryland. Reynolds has one race win–the Maryland International Raceway stop–and a semifinal appearance under his belt this season and is getting acclimated to the JT-B’s power output.

Before he ever entered an NMRA event, Reynolds installed the JT-B supercharger on his car as a replacement for his previous Paxton 2200SL self-contained supercharger–an impressive supercharger in its own right, and a solid comparison to Vortech’s original JT huffer.

“The car made 840 on the 2200SL on E-85, and then we swapped to the JT-B supercharger a little bit later in the year. I did change the crank pulley to help feed the blower, and I made 1,019 horsepower on the same fuel with no other changes–and in worse air. We saw a 3 psi difference in boost pressure,” says Reynolds.

For more information on the new V-7 JT-B supercharger and the complete line of Vortech superchargers, check out their website.